• Everything you need for a fantastic family holiday included. Toys, stairgates, fencing, cot, highchair, books, DVDs…

  • There was a time when we used to drift through unplanned, half-booked holidays in daring places

    Then we had a baby.

    (& now we have three under five).

  • Ranked one of top six family friendly villas in Europe by BA Highlife magazine.
    May 2014

  • Our villas are set up for families.
    From babies to big kids to teens.
    With plenty of space for Granny and Grandad too.

  • Happy kids, happy parents, happy holidays.

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Reasons to book with us

Ranked in top six family villas by BA Highlife
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We include everything you need for a brilliant holiday with children:

* Stairgates
* Fencing
* Sterilisers
* A buggy (or double buggy)
* Toys
* DVDs
* Books
* Cot/potty/changing mat
* High chair
*Cheery welcome person to help you with anything you need
* The best directions (ever)

* A welcome pack with a full review of everything to do (and what to skip) locally
* Plus, in most villas, free wifi.
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Flying with small kids

Seven things no one tells you
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1. No one meets you eye when you board the plane. At the end they either smile warmly and say how lovely your kids are. Or they *really* don't meet your eye.

2. You can't leave too much time because everything takes longer. And the second your stress rises, the kids go bananas.

3. The experience is heightened: security is more tricky (formula tastes filthy), the gates are further away and the childhood thrill at seeing planes close-up recaptures your heart.

4. It is impossible to pack enough stuff into carry on and still have space for a mag or two. Once you've done nappies, wipes, food, changes of clothes, books, toys and emergency sweets you have a sea container's load to lug about.

5. Which doesn't matter because until they are all at age when they can peacefully share a tablet, you don't get one moment's peace. You never imagined your fantasies would involve flying long-haul alone.

6. Delays and lost luggage are more than merely inconvenient - they pretty much push you over the edge of sanity. All the worse because you ditched that extra round of snacks for an unread Hello!

7. The sweetness of arrival can't be beaten: your kids hurl themselves straight into the water shrieking in delight while you open a very cold drink and happily remember the pristine mag at the bottom of your bag.

What did I miss?
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Teenage stuff

Our 15 y/o nephew is coming...
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Reckon we can take him to watch the cliff jumpers without risking him chucking himself over? And, if he does jump, will my sister go bananas? Answers on a postcard....
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Getting a baby passport in the UK

Nine top tips
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1. Previously the passport office has been really impressively slick. They currently (Easter 2014) have a serious backlog. Lucy's took precisely the three weeks quoted. My memory is that others came much sooner. They warn some are taking even longer than that so do it as soon as you get the birth certificate.2. Don't rely on fast-track. There are very few appointments to be had in busy times and you can't do one day for a first passport. We declined a mad dash to Liverpool (a mistake in retrospect). 3. Use the Post Office checking system as getting it all perfect is tricksy. We got four sets of forms and got it right on number three.4. Baby pics are an absolute horror. We use an iPhone and print through an online service that delivers (www.photobox.co.uk). It takes a few days. There are aps that review whether you have met the criteria or not. 5. Once you are in the system you are trapped. The very charming folks at the Irish call centre will answer questions only if you keep your reference number. Don't lose it! Until it's printed they can't tell you much (unless, I guess, there is a problem). 6. For love or money you can't get through to Peterborough directly.... The Irish team submits an email for you. There is a 48 hour call-back service. They leave it to the 48th hour. 7. Allegedly there is an upgrade process to rush some passports. They will not reveal the criteria for this. If anyone knows, do share. 8. It sounds obvious, but the baby really can't fly internationally without one. 9. The delivery man looks quite nervous when you try and hug him on your doorstep. Probably don't do this.
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Toys, toys, toys

The best bit is buying the new stuff
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The huge shop is done and we have playhouses, scooters, train sets, dolly buggies/push trucks, walkers, Connect Four, jenga, Frozen DVDs.... and much more. Storage is being expanded!
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BBQ time

Already thinking about those menus...
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The perfect pistachio rice to go with plump and spicy BBQ prawns. Note for the packing list: even more recipe books.
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Babytime

If you're worried about too much heat March - May and Sept - Nov rock
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Perfect balmy days for babies are the beginning and the end of the season. Everything included: highchairs, cots, listeners, toys, changing mats, sterilisers, baby-gym, bouncy chairs and pushchairs...
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Reader's Digest

“How do you ensure that a self-catering property you rent is Child-friendly? Cue Villas4Kids”
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Travel Website of the month Reader's Digest
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Anastasia water park

News
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“The Anastasia waterpark in Protaras is awesome” says Natalie (12) who stayed in villa Sophia in July. There are plenty of slides for the older kids and also a separate area for the little ones to join in the fun. It’s not cheap at €7.50 for under 12 and €15.00 adults, but a great day out with the kids. You can get food and drink in the park or pop out for a bite to eat at lunchtime at a local restaurant like Mojito’s (2 minutes’ walk).
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Thomas’s

Our absolute favourite rustic restaurant
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Previously the Chicken Shack and our favourite location on the island (help yourself drinks fridges, write your own order, brilliant kids area) has moved into the centre of Pernera. Still a bargain for simple food hosted by the mad (his words) but gregariously hospitable Thomas. From the moment we land, Christine starts her campaign to go - 'let's drive straight there' she says as the kids snore and the clock approaches 11 pm. If you only order the village salad, dips and bread you'll be happy. But the chicken tikka kebabs are always a win.
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Baby flying

Mama Duck Says...
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There's a secret no one tells your about your first baby. While you are exhausted and worrying about everything, other mothers of older/multiple children regard you with green eyes. They long for the simplicity of one newborn to give focus on. But they also - mostly! - remember how hard if is the first time around when everything is so new and uncertain. Of course flying is one of things that every new mum has concerns about and we get asked about a lot. But, if I had to choose, I'd take a little one on a plane long, long before an active toddler (of which more another time). It used to say in the red book they send you home from hospital something like 'your baby wants to be with you and you should be with your baby'. And that's the brilliant thing about a flight. You stay together. They can be warm and snug in your lap and you can get delirious hormone high from their baby-head smell. The watch outs include an explosive nappy, dramatic vomit and/or a screaming meltdown. Depending on your baby's temperament, you may find that plane noise and vibrations are surprisingly soothing: crying is partly muffled by the engine, not that you'll feel that to be the case. The only thing you can do if they do kick off is to stay as calm as you can. If you feel your stress rising, so will your baby. If you have a more chilled other half, pass the baby over as soon as you get worried. They say to feed on take-off and landing to un-pop ears but ours have never been much bothered by it. And try to enjoy it, which might sound crazy. But people are mostly incredibly kind: the stewards, other mums and families. Take your time. Welcome the support, gaze into the eyes of your little one and, when they fall asleep, read the papers. When you travel with your two year old you'll look back fondly on the experience. It's OK, I know you don't believe me.